Short Attention Span Math Seminars

Winter 2017

The Winter 2017 SASMS will be held on Tuesday, March 14 at 4:30 in MC 5479. If you would like to give a talk, you may do so by clicking "Sign Up" above.

Talks

Time
Speaker
Talk Title
4:30
Rana Abdel Monem Saleh
Ancient Methods of Constructing Cospectral Graphs
5:00
Shelley Wu
Folding operation on Standard Young Tableaux
5:30
Bryan Coutts
something something analysis
6:00
Food
Dinner
6:30
Sam Yusim
Graph Theory and Algebraic Topology
7:00
Hang Lu Su
Introduction to the growth of groups
7:30
Nam-Hwui Kim
A handwavy treatment of rigourous statistics
8:00
Ilia Chtcherbakov
Multiplicative groups of fields
8:30
Wenyi Zheng
A proof of the Gauss-Bonnet Theorem

Abstracts

Ancient Methods of Constructing Cospectral Graphs

Gonna talk about how people constructed cospectral graphs way back in the day before Godsil Mckay switching

Folding operation on Standard Young Tableaux

Folding is a bijection between Standard Young Tableaux (SYT) of the same shape. Given a rotationally symmetric 2-by-n SYT, it is know that the arc diagram of the folding of the SYT can be obtained by literally folding the diagram of the original SYT. In this talk, we will present an analogy of the above theorem for 3-by-2n rotationally symmetric SYT.

something something analysis

This is either going to be very elementary real analysis or very non-elementary real analysis.

Dinner

Hi. I'm food, and I'd like to introduce you to me.

Graph Theory and Algebraic Topology

I dunno what I'll do specifically. Probably some cool theorems about colouring.

Introduction to the growth of groups

I will introduce an aesthetically pleasing property of a group, called the growth (with respect to some generating set) and show how it relates to the Word problem.

A handwavy treatment of rigourous statistics

TFW the bashing you do in statistics actually means something.

Multiplicative groups of fields

A seemingly innocuous question about basic abstract algebra—"Can you put a field on the group of units of another field?"—has a surprisingly profound answer—"Sometimes."—that ventures deep into the heart of model theory.